Rathfarnham Historical Society 1916 History Walk

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Volunteers at Church of the Annunciation, Rathfarnham. Courtesy of the Pearse Museum.

Rathfarnham Historical Society are holding a  History Walk Commemorating ‘Pearse’s Own’ Rathfarnham 1916 Volunteers

 

 on Saturday 29th April, commencing at 11.30 am

Meet outside the old cemetery gate in Rathfarnham Village (near AIB bank) at 11:30 am. The walk will proceed through the village finishing at the Pearse museum St Enda’s Park. The duration of the walk is approx. 90 minutes. Along the way you’ll pass the homes of most of the local volunteers who fought in the GPO in 1916.
 

All are welcome

Public Lecture on the History of Bohernabreena Reservoir

The Heritage Society of Engineers Ireland in association with the ICE ROI Branch present:
History of Bohernabreena Reservoirs and their Relevance to Milling on the Dodder and Poddle
by Don McEntee
Monday, 6th March 2017 at 6.30pm

At Engineers Ireland, 22 Clyde Road, Dublin 4

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Although little is known of the remote history of the Dodder, some sadly incomplete records survive of mills that worked in the thirteenth century. Considerably more is known about the industrial development of the river and its tributaries that began in the late seventeenth century. Until the late 1800s water, where available, was the preferred power source for most mills and factories.

In the Dodder catchment the Bohernabreena Reservoirs, more properly known as the Glenasmole Reservoirs, were completed in1886 and they had an unique role in water supply to Rathmines and the millers’ compensation water to keep mills working during periods of drought.

In the catchment sources of clear water were used for drinking and the coloured bog water for the compensation supply. In the nineteenth century the technology did not exist to remove colour from bog water. Therefore, the principle of construction adopted at Bohernabreena was the method known as the separation principle.

Don McEntee will describe the events leading up to and including the construction of the reservoirs. A short history of the various types of watermills on the Dodder and Poddle will be given.

Don McEntee, now retired, was a Senior Engineer in the Design Section (water and drainage) of the Engineering Department of Dublin City Council. During his involvement in charge of upgrading of the spillways to the two reservoirs in Bohernabreena he researched the original design of the waterworks with his co-author Michael Corcoran he published a book in 2016 titled The Rivers Dodder & Poddle Mills, Storms, Droughts and The Public Water Supply

For Details please go to: http://www.engineersireland.ie
Or contact Con Kehely:
con.kehely@nationaltransport.ie
All Welcome
Admission Free
No booking required
This event will be webcast and can be viewed here: http://www.engineersireland.ie/Events/Live.aspx

Battle of Tallaght 150

South Dublin County Council Libraries is delighted to present events in commemoration of the 150th Anniversary of the Fenian Rising and the Battle of Tallaght, which occurs on 5th March 2017.

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Contemporary print depicting the Battle of Tallaght, which was printed in the London Illustrated News

As part of the Dublin Fenian uprising in March 1867, several thousand members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood made their way to gather on Tallaght Hill, ready for rebellion. Their tactic was to draw the military out of Dublin while a separate rising took place in the city. A small contingent engaged in battle at the police station in Tallaght village. The RIC Sub-Inspector at Tallaght was watching the exodus of men from the city, and sent 14 armed officers out to the crossroads of the Main Road and Greenhills Road, where a battle with about 40 Fenians ensued. The ‘Battle of Tallaght’ was really just a skirmish in the village, but Tallaght was to be the site of the main battle of the Fenian uprising. However, the city centre was heavily fortified and the expected rising there didn’t happen. The large gathering of up to eight thousand men on Tallaght Hill was left leaderless, and eventually dispersed. The hoped for rising petered out.

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Tallaght RIC Station, site of the Battle of Tallaght

Local historian Seán Bagnall will give a lecture on ‘The Battle of Tallaght’ on Thursday 2nd March at 7:00 pm at the County Library, Tallaght. All welcome, book your place here.

An exhibition on the Battle of Tallaght can be viewed at the County Library, Tallaght from 2nd March to 31st March during library opening hours.

5th and 6th class students from local Tallaght schools will be invited to visit the library for a presentation and a tour of the exhibition.

For further information, please contact Síle Coleman or Michael Keyes at the County Library, Tallaght on 01 4620073 or localstudies@sdublincoco.ie

Some more retro technology – with a Christmas connection

Lantern slides originated in the 17th Century and were originally hand pained images which were placed into a primitive wooden projection box and viewed in succession in order to narrate a story. They were a very early form of cinema which by the mid-1800s, with the advent of photography, had evolved to the stage where real-life scenes could be reproduced on glass and displayed.

These could be hand-tinted for added realism and the resulting slide show would have been an immersive experience using what was then cutting-edge technology in an era when newspapers contained only text, and books were a luxury few could afford.

In Local Studies  we have a historic collection of photographs of the Holy Land dating from 1908 and these were shown in Clondalkin Carnegie Library on the occasion of its opening in 1911. The names of the locations are a roll-call of famous Biblical locations.

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Lantern slide showing paper frame and handwritten caption

 

Taken in 1908, these images show the people and views of the Holy Land appearing virtually unchanged in 2,000 years. It is not too hard to imagine the Holy Family wandering these streets in search of accommodation.

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View of Bethlehem

 

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The site of the Angel’s appearance to the shepherds

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Titled “A Jerusalem Jew”

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An Arab shop

 

Other slides include views of locations associated with Easter including the Garden of Gethsemane and the Mount of Olives which we will return to at a later date.

One view in particular is particularly poignant – the very first photograph of the ancient Monumental Arch of Palmyra which was built in the 3rd Century and is seen here in its original form before it was restored in the 1930s. It was destroyed by Islamist Militants in October 2015.

 

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Triumphal Arch, Palmyra.

 

Click HERE to see the entire collection.

New on Source – Rare stereoscopic photos of WWI

Just in and newly digitised, Local Studies have loaded onto our Source digital archive a set of Stereograph images from World War 1.

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Originally intended to be viewed through a stereoscope, stereograph images were taken using a camera with three lenses in a triangular formation. The lens at the top provided a view of the scene for the photographer to help with the composition of the photo, while the two lenses below took two photographs from very slightly differing angles.

Viewing the resulting photographs through a stereoscope, the user would be able to “merge” the two images by looking through the viewer’s lenses – effectively recreating the three dimensional effect originally captured by the two cameras.

Stereographs had two eras of popularity. The first was in the 1850s and 60s. They became popular again in the late 1890s, lasting for the duration of the First World War and declining again after its end.

This particular set of images was taken and published by Hilton DeWitt Girdwood under the trademark of “Realistic Travels”. The set contains images from many different conflict locations – not only France and Belgium, but Gallipoli, Jerusalem, Baghdad and Egypt also make an appearance. Some images were disapproved of by the British government. Not because of the graphic nature of some of them, but because they had been staged by Girdwood. It was feared that staging of photographs could undermine the “authenticity” of war reporting in general.

All of the photographs were all taken in the field – even the staged ones.

See if you can guess why this one must have been staged:

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The answer of course is that a flash was used to illuminate the scene. This would never have been allowed if a real night attack was in progress as it would have alerted the enemy.

The detail contained in the photos is striking. Here are some closeups of a few of the scenes:

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Assault at Trones Wood

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German soldier being searched. His discarded rifle lies nearby.

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Troops prepare to attack Turkish forces at Cape Helles, Gallipoli.

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A tank in action at Cambrai.

See the entire collection HERE. Note the collection shows some images of death.