Tallaght Historical Society 2015/16 Lecture Series

Tuesday 8th September 2015

Defending Ireland from the Irish   James Devitt

Tuesday 29th September 2015

Calligraphy: Codes and Catastrophies  David Smith

Tuesday 13th October 2015

The Sinking of the Lusitania  Cormac Lowth

Tuesday 10th November 2015

History of Dublin’s Fruit and Vegetable Markets  John Conroy

Tuesday 8th September 2015

Leo Swan Memorial Lecture – TBC

Tuesday 12th January 2016

James Connolly  James Connolly Heron

Tuesday 9th February 2016

Roger Casement  John McGuigan

Tuesday 8th March 2016

Josie: a Brief Flame  Michael Ó Doibhilín

Tuesday 22nd March 2016

The Lives of the 1916 Leaders  Seán O’Gorman

Tuesday 12th April 2016

The Irish Poets of World War One  Frank Tracy

Tuesday 10th May 2016

Early Irish Farming  John Dolan

Tuesday 14th June 2016

19th Century Beggars in Ireland  Seán Bagnall

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All lectures take place at 7:00pm in the County Library, Tallaght, and all are welcome.

Tallaght Historical Society Contact: Anne Hanrahan at 01 2441463 or 0876315773

Stones of Dublin: the History of Dublin in Ten Buildings

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This year’s Red Line Book Festival takes place from 14-19 October.

As part of the festival, on Wednesday 15th October at 7pm, author Lisa Marie Griffith will be visiting Tallaght Library to talk about her book ‘Stones of Dublin: a history of Dublin in ten buildings‘.

Behind the façades of the city’s most historic buildings, is the story of Dublin. The buildings are Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin Castle, Trinity College Dublin, the Old Parliament House (Bank of Ireland), City Hall, Kilmainham Gaol, St James’ Gate Brewery, the GPO, the Abbey Theatre and Croke Park. Bringing together the story of these landmark buildings takes us on a wonderful journey through the shifting social, political and cultural history of Ireland’s capital.

Dr. Lisa Marie Griffith is from Waterford. She studied history at University College Dublin obtained a PhD from Trinity College. She became fascinated by the history of Dublin and throughout her studies worked as a walking tour guide in Dublin. She also presented a series on Anna Livia (now Dublin City FM) for two years on Dublin History. She taught history and is now Coordinator of the Cultural and Heritage Studies Programme at the National Print Museum in Dublin.

To book for this free event, please call us on 01 4620073 or email talib@sdublincoco.ie

The full line up for the Red Line Book Festival is available at http://www.redlinebookfestival.com/

Social Conditions in Dublin Prior to The Lockout, a talk by Catriona Crowe

Lockout Lecture poster

Dublin in the early 20th century had some of worst living conditions in Europe. A third of the city’s population lived in tenements.  A government report at the time stated: “There are many tenement houses with seven or eight rooms that house a family in each room, and contain a population of between forty and fifty souls. We have visited one house that we found to be occupied by 98 persons…”  Average wages for the working classes barely covered the cost of existing. The meagre diets of Dublin’s poor, along with the lack of sanitation and overcrowding meant that infectious diseases flourished and infant mortality was common.

It was against this background of poverty that the Lockout took place.

Using the 1911 Census, Catriona Crowe will give a talk on Social Conditions in Dublin Prior to the Lockout next Tuesday 20th August at 7pm in the County Library, Tallaght.

Catriona Crowe is Head of Special Projects at the National Archives of Ireland. She is Manager of the Irish Census Online Project, which has placed the 1901 and 1911 censuses online free of charge over the last 4 years.  She is editor of Dublin 1911, published by the Royal Irish Academy in 2011. She is also Vice-President of the Irish Labour History Society, and a former President of the Women’s History Association. She contributes regularly to the broadcast and print media on cultural and historical matters.

All welcome – this is not to be missed!